Volume 2 Issue 1

Case Report: Activation Profile of Pectoralis Major, Deltoid and Supraspinatus Muscle in Brachial Plexus Injury Patient with Shoulder Sublaxation using Shoulder Sling - a Case Report

Poly Ghosh1*, PK Lenka2 and Abhishek Biswas3

Brachial plexus lesions frequently lead to significant physical disability, psychologic distress, and socioeconomic hardship. Adult brachial plexus injuries can be caused by various mechanisms, including penetrating injuries, falls, and motor vehicle trauma. Often the diagnosis is delayed or ignored as the practitioner waits for some recovery. Expedient diagnosis and testing is the best means of maximizing functional return. Evaluators must remember that muscles will begin to undergo atrophy and lose motor end plates as soon as the proximal injury occurs [1].

Cite this Article: Ghosh P, Lenka PK, Biswas A, Activation Profile of Pectoralis Major, Deltoid and Supraspinatus Muscle in Brachial Plexus Injury Patient with Shoulder Sublaxation using Shoulder Sling - a Case Report. Int J Neurol Dis. 2018;2(1): 006-009.

Published: 18 May 2018

Research Article: The Role of Transcranial Doppler in the Assessment of Right-to-Left Shunt in Scuba Divers

Gian P. Anzola1*, Clara Bartolaminelli2, Sofia Fioravanti3, Paolo Lega4, Paolo Limoni5 and Pasquale Longobardi6

Introduction and Method: The presence of a Right-to-Left Shunt (RLS), most commonly produced by a patent foramen ovale, has been correlated to Decompression Illness (DI) in scuba divers and is suspected to increase the risk of suffering diving accidents. In the present study, RLS was comparatively investigated in a consecutive series of 309 divers with and without DI and in 97 healthy control subjects. All cases were submitted to Transcranial Doppler (TCD) examination. The presence of RLS was confirmed by pulmonary scintigraphy and / or echocardiographic tests if the RLS as assessed with TCD was large.
Results: The frequency of DI was the same in recreational and professional divers. DI positive were significantly older than DI negative divers (45 + 10 vs. 42 + 11 year old respectively, p = 0.047). Big shunts were statistically more frequent in DI positive (78%) than in DI negative (56%) divers, in DI positive than in controls (19%) and in DI negative than controls. Small shunts were more frequent in DI positive (42%) divers than in controls (20%), in DI negative (35%) divers than in controls, but not in DI positive compared with DC negative divers. The presence of a big shunt and age turned independent predictors of DI.

Cite this Article: Anzola GP, Bartolaminelli C, Fioravanti S, Lega P, Limoni P, et al. The Role of Transcranial Doppler in the Assessment of Right-to-Left Shunt in Scuba Divers. Int J Neurol Dis. 2018;2(1): 001-005.

Published: 18 March 2018

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