Volume 2 Issue 1

Research Article: Evaluation of Sleep Disorders, Anxiety, Depression, and Psychiatric Disorders in Hand Surgery Patients

Tan Jun*, Khan Alick, Chen Jing and Wang Yang

Objective: To investigate the presence of sleep disorders, anxiety, depression, psychiatric disorders, and somatization in patients with severe traumatic hand surgery using a formal diagnostic criterion based on International Classification of Sleep Disorders icsd3, Modified Hand Injury Severity Score (MHISS), Beck Depression Inventory, and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS).
Method: Total 50 patients were selected from the department of Hand Surgery at Affiliated Hospital of Nantong medical university. The patients were divided according the MHISS score and interviewed using Sleep Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale.
Results: Sleep disorders (insomnia) were reported in 24% of the patients, psychiatric disorders in 22%, somatization disorder in 8%, severe depression in 4%, moderate depression in 8%, and mild depression in 32% of the patients. Symptoms of anxiety were reported 4% patients. According to the MHISS score 3 patients were severely injured, 7 patients were moderately injured, and 38 patients were slightly injured. The records of 2 patients were missing.
Conclusion: Our study found the presence of sleeping disorders (insomnia), depression, psychiatric disorder, and somatization disorder in hand surgery patients. Their rate of occurrence was not high, but it was not negligible. The rate of anxiety was the lowest. The incidence rate of the symptoms of severe depression, moderate depression, mild depression, and psychiatric disorder (somatization) has shown its presence in hand trauma patients but they have shown no significant correlation with the severity of hand injury. Attention should be paid to these symptoms and disorders postoperatively and refer the patients to a proper psychological assessment.
Keywords: Sleeping disorders; Insomnia; Hand surgery; Depression, Anxiety somatization disorder

Cite this Article: Jun T, Alick K, Jing C, Evaluation of Sleep Disorders, Anxiety, Depression, and Psychiatric Disorders in Hand Surgery Patients. Int J Sports Sci Med. 2018;2(1): 025-030.

Published: 24 April 2018

Review Article: Does Running Yield to Specific Cortisol and Testosterone Answer Yielding to an Own Phenotype? - A Review

Benedikt Gasser*

This study aimed to summarize effects of running on the glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid and androgen system. Interaction between running and the CRH-ACTH-Adrenal gland System with its interaction on steroid hormone level are not finally understood. It seems that the System mainly plays a role of intermediation. Some hints exist, that before running due to anticipation cortisol levels start to rise and peak during running. Normalization of concentration in healthy humans even after large exercises such as marathon running, 1000km running or crossing Alaska occurs within one week. In contrast to glucocorticoids androgens seem to be lower after running. For different androgens such as Testosterone or Dihydrotestosteron sulfate a decrease could be detected after exercising. For mineralcorticoid effects are heterogeneous, probably due to direct feedback via Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System and therefore ACTH which parallel influences Cortisol secretion. Trying to decipher effects of training, it is to mention, that effects on steroid hormones are dependent on intensity-e.g. interval versus long-jog-as well as of absolute time of exercising. To sum up, especially the increased cortisol levels and decreased testosterone levels could yield to a manifestation of a different phenotype of endurance versus strength athlete. The ratio of Cortisol to Testosterone seems to be relevant for a phenotypic development. This ratio determines anabolic (high-ratio) versus catabolic (low-ratio) effects on different organ system e.g. skeletal muscle and can influence the development of a specific somatotype.

Cite this Article: Gasser B. Does Running Yield to Specific Cortisol and Testosterone Answer Yielding to an Own Phenotype? - a Review. Int J Sports Sci Med. 2018;2(1): 016-024.

Published: 15 March 2018

Research Article: Physical Activity Prescription for Chronic Diseases: Attitude and Role of Healthcare Professionals in Hospital Setting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Getu Teferi1*, Harish Kumar2 and Paramvir Singh2

Introduction: Physical inactivity is a fast growing public health problem and contributes to a variety of chronic diseases and health complications. Currently physical inactivity is one of the major causes of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). NCDs cause more than 36 million deaths per year across the globe (comprising approximately 63% of all deaths) according to (WHO, 2013).
Methods and materials: A descriptive survey design was used to assess healthcare professionals' attitude towards physical activity counseling and prescription for non-communicable diseases in hospital setting. The sample hospitals were selected randomly based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sample size was determined by using the formula for estimating a single population proportion.
Results: A total of 442 healthcare professionals from 7 government hospitals in Addis Ababa city were participated in the study. From these hospitals 387 healthcare professionals (physicians = 135, 34.9%, nurses = 218, 56.3% and physiotherapist = 34, 8.8%) were completed the questionnaire. Majority of HCPs (n = 385, 90.1%) agree to good physical activity habits of HCPs can encourage their patients to exercise and maintain good health (Table 1). Most of HCPs (88.5%) agree that exercise counseling/prescribing is important in the field of HCP practice, (76.5%) believed that only advise patients about PA if linked to current problem, (78.2%) HCPs agree that discussing the benefits of physically active lifestyle with patients is part of HCPs' role, while only (37.7%) of HCPs believe that exercise is as effective as medicine. In general most of healthcare professionals were had positive attitude towards counseling PA as preventative or management modality for chronic diseases.
Conclusion: Majority of HCPs agree to good physical activity habits of HCPs can encourage their patients to exercise and maintain good health. Most of HCPs agree that exercise counseling/prescribing is important in the field of HCPs' practice, and this study suggest that physicians were more likely to agree that they advised patients about PA only if it was linked to the current condition and if the patient ask about physical activity.
Keywords: Physical activity prescription/counseling; Non-communicable diseases; Healthcare professionals; Attitude; Role

Cite this Article: Teferi G, Kumar H, Singh P. Physical Activity Prescription for Chronic Diseases: Attitude and Role of Healthcare Professionals in Hospital Setting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Int J Sports Sci Med. 2018;2(1): 010-015

Published: 14 March 2018

Mini Review: Sun Safety in Outdoor Athletes

Lily Park DO*, and Russell John Young MD

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States [1]. One in five Americans are projected to develop skin cancer in their lifetime [2]. Although skin cancers are known to be the most successfully treated human cancers, [3] it is estimated to cost approximately $8.1 billion annually to treat skin cancers [4] with more than one million new diagnoses of skin cancers each year in the United States [5].

Cite this Article: Park L, Young RJ. Sun Safety in Outdoor Athletes. Int J Sports Sci Med. 2018;2(1): 008-009.

Published: 17 February 2018

Research Article: Assessment of Nutritional Status, Body Composition Parameters, & Physiological Profiles of Young Male Taekwondo and Wushu Players

Surojit Sarkar, Monalisa Debnath, Subhra Chatterjee (Nee Karmakar), and SK Dey*

Background: Present study was undertaken to assess and compare the nutritional status, body composition profiles and physiological parameters of taekwondo and wushu players.
Methods: Twelve male taekwondo (15.9 ± 1.83 years) and fourteen wushu (15.5 ± 1.82 yrs) players belonging to the weight category of 60kg and 55kg respectively with minimum of 3 - 4 years of formal training history were evaluated for height, weight, skin fold thicknesses, body composition, handgrip strength, relative back strength, VO2 max and nutritional status following standard protocols.
Results: Mean weight and height of taekwondo and wushu players were found to be 57.8 ± 7.79 kg and 55.0 ± 5.73 kg and 170 ± 4.95 cm & 167.4 ± 5.08 cm respectively. No significant difference was observed in Body Mass Index (BMI) and body fat% when compared between them, although taekwondo players showed higher mean values. They also exhibited insignificantly higher handgrip and relative back strength (right: 41.3 ± 8.09 kg; left: 41.1 ± 9.25 kg; 2.0 ± 0.39 kg/kg body wt) than their wushu counterpart (right: 40.2 ± 5.76; left: 38.9 ± 6.44; 1.8 ± 0.20). Wushu players exhibited higher aerobic capacity (VO2 max = 44.3 ± 7.41 ml/kg/min), whereas taekwondo players showed higher anaerobic capacity (average power = 265.3 ± 39.53 watt) as compared to their respective counterpart. Dietary assessment revealed that total calorie consumption was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in taekwondo players than wushu players although both the groups failed to meet their RDA. Both Taekwondo and wushu players showed optimal dietary intake of phosphorus (2670.8 ± 406.43 mg; 2308.4 ± 182.11 mg), ascorbic acid (55.8 ± 15.34; 53.6 ± 15.78 mg) and vitamin B12 (1.7 ± 0.55 μg; 1.8 ± 0.59 μg). Whereas, crude fiber (9.8 ± 2.30 mg; 8.6 ± 1.45 mg), calcium (679.4 ± 78.94 mg; 694.6 ± 88.43 mg), iron (24.1 ± 5.06 mg; 22.2 ± 1.92 mg) and vitamin A (503.1 ± 114.25 μg; 507.1 ± 141.72 μg) intake were low in both the groups than the standard dietary guidelines respectively.
Conclusion: Above findings indicated that taekwondo players have lower body fat percentages, higher body cell mass and muscle mass which may be explained as their indulgence in more resistance training although both the groups consumed adequate protein. It can also be concluded that better nutrition of taekwondo players may have resulted in comparatively better static strength and body composition profile.

Cite this Article: Sarkar S, Debnath M, Chatterjee S, Dey SK. Assessment of Nutritional Status, Body Composition Parameters, & Physiological Profiles of Young Male Taekwondo and Wushu Players. Int J Sports Sci Med. 2018;2(1): 001-007.

Published: 04 January 2018

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