Volume 1 Issue 1

Opinion: Age Related Macular Degeneration: Where are we now?

Marianne L. Shahsuvaryan*

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disease affecting central vision, representing the leading cause of irreversible blindness among older adults aged over 50 years old and affecting approximately 11 million individuals in the United States and 170 million worldwide [1]. The latest findings evidenced increased incidence of AMD not only in the industrialized world, but also in Africa [2]. With the aging population the problem is heightening, thus underscoring not only medical, but at the same time a big socio-economic challenge [3].

Cite this Article: Shahsuvaryan ML. Age Related Macular Degeneration: Where are we now? Int J Ophthal Vision Res. 2017;1(1): 020-021.

Published: 25 July 2017

Research Article: Studies on Conjunctival Vessel Morphology in Diabetic Patients: a Short Review

Rishi Sharma*, VS Gurunadh and Sandeep Shankar

Diabetes mellitus is a disease associated with both micro and macro-vascular angiopathy. The classical example is the manifestation seen in the retinal vessels. Paralleling the manifestation in the retina are the manifestations in the renal, cardiac, and cerebral circulations. The visual deficits which arise out of the manifestation in the retina and the life threatening complications which arise out of the manifestations in the kidney, heart and CNS have been responsible for the extensive studies done on the same which have been extensively studied documented and treated.

Cite this Article: Sharma R, Gurunadh VS, Shankar S. Studies on Conjunctival Vessel Morphology in Diabetic Patients: a Short Review. Int J Ophthal Vision Res. 2017;1(1): 016-019.

Published: 18 July 2017

Case Report: Ectopia Lentis in a 2- Year - Old Child with Marfan syndrome

Hannah Muniz Castro*, Audrey Xi Tai, Marjan Farid

Purpose: We report a rare case of a 2 - year-old child with ectopia lentis and potential Marfan syndrome (MFS) and discuss her management.
Methods: A 2 - year - old female with no significant past medical history was brought in by her mother after complaints that the child has recently been holding everything close to her eyes while simultaneously shifting her head down. Her mother reported no history of pain or trauma. The child's family history was negative for ectopia lentis or MFS.
Results: On presentation, the patient did not exhibit any remarkable marfanoid skeletal features. The patient underwent a full ophthalmologic examination. Slit lamp examination revealed deep anterior chambers, superotemporal lens subluxation, and stretched and intact zonules in both eyes (OU). The patient was referred to genetics for gene testing and found to have a c.364C > T mutation in the FBN1 gene, supporting a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Due to a high irregular lenticular astigmatism, inability to obtain a functional manifest refraction for glasses, and high risk of refractive amblyopia, she was referred to us for lensectomy and secondary intraocular lens placement.
Conclusion: Ectopia lentis is the most common ophthalmologic finding of MFS, but does not commonly present in pediatric patients this young. It is important to investigate genetic and metabolic causes in order to accurately diagnose and determine appropriate medical management for each patient. In cases of amblyogenic lens dislocations, an early lensectomy and secondary scleral fixated intraocular lens placement is a feasible option.

Cite this Article: Castro HM, Tai AX, Farid M. Ectopia Lentis in a 2- Year - Old Child with Marfan syndrome. Int J Ophthal Vision Res. 2017;1(1): 012-015.

Published: 29 May 2017

Review Article: Practical Guide for Premium IOLs in 2017

Gilles Lesieur*

The use of premium IOLs requires more specifically than standard monofocal IOLs a thorough clinical and para clinical examination using modern equipments.
We will only mention micro-incision premium IOLs that are used in our daily practice. All information regarding the characteristics of all available and especially multifocal IOLs are available in the SFO 2012 Report on presbyopia [1].

Cite this Article: Lesieur G. Practical Guide for Premium IOLs in 2017. Int J Ophthal Vision Res. 2017;1(1): 006-011.

Published: 18 April 2017

Research Article: One-Field of View vs. Two-Fields of View; Is a Macula Centered Photograph Adequate for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening?

Mirriam Shah*, Hannah Fellows, Helen Wharton, Laurence Quant and Paul Dodson

Aim: To compare one Field Of View (1 - FOV) and two Field Of View (2 - FOV) photography for diabetic retinopathy detection by assessing and comparing disease level and outcome.
Methods: A retrospective audit of a random sample of 500 patients with known proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR or R3), and 500 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR or R2). Images were re-assessed according to the English program criteria for DR levels using 1-FOV.
Results: Using 1-FOV; in 387 (77.6%) of the 500 PDR patients, the DR level was agreed and referred urgently into the eye clinic. In the remaining 112 (22.4%) DR levels were downgraded.
Using 1-FOV; in 297 (59.4%) of the 500 NPDR patients the retinopathy level was agreed and referred routinely into the eye clinic. The remaining 203 (40.6%) were downgraded. Of these patients, 115 (56.6%) would have been routinely referred into the eye clinic due to the presence of surrogate markers for macula edema only and 88 (43.4%) to annual screening.
Conclusion: Using 2-FOV photography allows for an increased view of the peripheral retina and identification of advanced DR. In contrast, 1-FOV did not show PDR (R3) in 1 in 5 cases and NPDR (R2) in 2 in 5 as both DR levels assigned and of concern clinical outcomes were altered. Therefore 1 - FOV is not identifying serious DR levels in a number of cases with potential adverse significance to clinical ocular outcomes. This audit supports that 2-FOV is superior in accuracy of identification of levels of diabetic retinopathy compared to 1-FOV.

Cite this Article: Shah M, Fellows H, Wharton H, Quant L, Dodson P. One-Field of View vs. Two-Fields of View; Is a Macula Centered Photograph Adequate for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening?. Int J Ophthal Vision Res. 2017;1(1): 001-005.

Published: 28 March 2017

Submit ManuscriptSubmit Special Issue

Authors submit all Proposals and manuscripts via Electronic Form!

All Journals

Creative Commons License Open Access by SciRes Literature is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Based on a work at www.scireslit.com.